How to Apologize…

a·pol·o·gya regretful acknowledgment of an offense or failure.
(Lexico powered by Oxford)

For most of us, we learn to apologize early in life. It goes something like this – “Tell your sister that you’re sorry.” The response (if there is one) is often a reluctant, “I’m sorry.” Some of us haven’t advanced very far from our preadolescent apologies.

Duke Kwon, pastor of Grace Meridian Hill in the nation’s capital, shared some good thoughts on apologizing via his Twitter account (@dukekwondc). Read this slowly. It can be a great plumbline to evaluate your own efforts at apologizing.

HOW TO APOLOGIZE

  • express sorrow (“I’m sorry”)
  • own guilt (“I was wrong”)
  • name specific wrongs (“I did X”) 
  • name impact (“I hurt you”)
  • no IFs (sorry “if I…”)
  • don’t blameshift/defend (“but you…”)
  • no passive voice (“sorry you were offended”)
  • make amends (“what can I do…”)
    (I made slight changes in this list adding quotation marks, changing “u” to “you” where needed, and adding elipses for clarity)

Very often, “I’m sorry” is just the beginning of repairing the damage. I’ll admit that I have too often thought my apology was the end of the matter. Sometimes it is: Forgiveness and understanding are extended, and the issue is put in the past. More often than not, however, some follow up is essential.

Such follow up may include a genuine expression of remorse over the offense and/or a change of attitude or actions. If the offense was something repeated or was very hurtful, it may take a good bit of time for the offended person to process what happened, sort through all the emotions, and take the initial steps toward forgiveness and restoration. To expect someone to quickly “forgive and forget” can be unrealistic.

It is also important to add that forgiveness can be extended without the relationship simply picking up where it left off. Some actions irreparably damage relationships. A person may forgive another but chose to break off the relationship because of deep or repeated abuse by that person.

Application time — Is there someone to whom you need to apologize today?

Check back for my next post – “How to Forgive…”

Starting a Blog…

Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

I was asked earlier today by a friend how he could go about starting a blog. Although I’ve been doing this off and on for a while, I haven’t been great at the blogging thing. I don’t have a ton of people who follow the blog, but I do get a few positive comments that keep me coming back. In fact, I made a commitment to do 4-5 blogs each month (approximately one per week).

Having given the whole starting a blog question some thought, I figured it might be good to put my thoughts “out there” in case others were considering doing a blog of their own. So, here goes…

There are a few decisions you’ll want to make as you get started. The first is the kind of blog you want to post. If you look around the internet, you’ll find an abundance of variety. Some people even have multiple blogs because they want more than one platform to discuss or display various topics. I even know one person who has a private blog. It provides a journal-like outlet for her emotions, struggles, and ideas, but the privacy setting means that nobody else is insider her head. Honestly, I’m a little too paranoid for that approach figuring I’d somehow get hacked and end up being totally embarrassed.

Okay, so what kind of blog do you want to create. The possibilities are nearly endless. If you’re into creative writing, you could post your poems or maybe even a short story that you publish chapter by chapter. If you’re a photographer, a blog can be a good place to put your favorite photos. If you travel a lot, then a blog chronicling your adventures might be fun. An artist could use a blog to post pictures of his or her artwork. Have opinions? You find tons of blogs with the express purpose of expressing opinions. Do you love movies or read a lot of books? You can write reviews. So, what’s your idea? I’m now thinking of a blog that does doughnut reviews…

You’ll also need to determine where you’ll host your posts. Some people stick with putting their creative work on something like Facebook. That could work. If you already have “friends” there, then you already have an audience. Facebook is, however, a limited format. I chose WordPress as my platform, but you can do a quick Google search to find many other options. If you use the WordPress.com subdomain, it’s free. If you want your own domain name, you’ll need to secure that separately. It is not too hard – I was able to do it!

Oh… you’ll have a lot of options to format your page no matter which platform you choose. Look through the free options first. You can tell which are graphics-driven and which are text-driven. Pick the one that fits what you’re trying to create. Most of the time you can change fonts and colors to suit your taste.

Alright… you’ve got an idea for a blog. You’ve settled on a platform and determined who will host the repository of your creative genius. What’s next? You need a name. I know you already have a name, but your blog needs one. Think about this. You want something that reflects who you are and what you want to produce. I chose “Transforming Grace” because I am the pastor of Grace Fellowship. I had a ready-made tie-in for that name. I also want my blogs always to be seasoned by grace. Finally, I believe in the transforming power of God’s grace, and I’d love for everyone to experience it, too.

One word of caution — Don’t get overly creative with the name. Seriously, you can really overthink this one. If your name is Bob, you could very easily name it “Bob’s Blog.” The name should match the content.

Your next step could be to accumulate material or ideas. I keep a list of ideas in Evernote. If my well runs dry, I can always go to my list and find something good. I also clip articles from the internet and save those in Evernote. You can use any “container” to save your stuff. The key is to be able to access it when you need it.

Let me mention a word about proofreading. Find someone who can look through your work – before posting preferably! If you wrote it, you’re more apt to overlook errors because you know what you intended to type. By the way, I’m TERRIBLE at this. Once I get something typed up, I want to hit the “publish” button immediately. My wife often corrects me after she’s read it. I think she enjoys that. My sister even got into the act with my last post. You can save your draft and have someone look it over… if you can wait that long!

I’m sure I forgot something important, but I’ll add what I assume is my final point – Get started. It’s the whole “journey of a thousand miles” thing. God is a creative God, and we are made in His image. The internet gives us an opportunity to express that creativity and for others to be blessed by it. I’ll look forward to seeing your creative work out there on the interwebs!

The Power of WITH…

I don’t typically geek out over prepositions. Prepositions are a part of speech we use every day. Of…In…Over…Through…After… the list goes on and on. But after a conversation I had yesterday, it struck me just how powerful the preposition “with” can be.

“With” carries with it connotations of togetherness. “I am not completing this task alone. I am doing it WITH someone else.” There is comfort in the idea of togetherness, brotherhood, camaraderie. Certainly, there are times when we like to be alone or wish to accomplish a task on our own, but “with” means we don’t always have to!

The Bible echoes our need for “with.” If we go back to Genesis, the very first book of the Bible, we find God in His creating process. At the end of each creative day, we read, “…and it was good.” Everything God created was good. Then, in the Garden of Eden, God said of Adam, “It is not good for man to be alone” (Genesis 2:18). Adam needed “with.”

In Ecclesiastes 4:9-12, we get another heavy dose of the importance of “with.” Two are better than one, because they have a good reward for their toil. For if they fall, one will lift up his fellow. But woe to him who is alone when he falls and has not another to lift him up! Again, if two lie together, they keep warm, but how can one keep warm alone? And though a man might prevail against one who is alone, two will withstand him—a threefold cord is not quickly broken. (ESV) Although the word “with” is not present, the idea of it fills those verses.

We also see Jesus investing Himself in the lives of His disciples. He did more than just show up and give lectures to them five days a week. He spent time with them, going through life, demonstrating His love and power, giving them responsibilities, correcting them, encouraging them, sharing meals with them, laughing and crying with them. In short, Jesus “did life” with them. Could we have a better example of “with”?

Let me encourage you to think about “with.” In your home, be with your spouse, your children, your parents. It’s easy to just zone out watching TV or get caught up in video games or the internet. Value “with.” Intentionally find ways to maximize with-ness in your family.

In your friendships, do the very same thing. Be “with” your friends. Treasure those friendships. Make time for togetherness. It’s may be easier to be a homebody, to spend endless hours streaming Netflix in your pajamas. Certainly, there are times we need to be alone – some more than others – but God created us for “with.”

The power of “with” in church is incredible. To invite someone to come “with” you to church is far more powerful than simply inviting them to church. To ask someone to come and serve “with” you in ministry is far more likely to engage them in service than to simply ask them to perform a ministry task alone. We see the practice of “with” in our small groups, in our fellowship time, in our mission trips, and in service projects in the community. “With” energizes and engages.

I’d be negligent if I did not also mention the power of “with” in our relationship with God. Before ascending into heaven, Jesus gave His disciples what we commonly call “the Great Commission.” Here it is – “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” (Matthew 28:18-20)

“I will be WITH you.” That is the promise of Jesus to every one of His followers. That should not surprise us. Psalm 23 reminds us that God is “with” us even in the valley of the shadow of death. Isaiah tells us that the Messiah who was to come (Jesus) would be called Immanuel (Isaiah 7:14), which the gospel of Matthew tells us means “God with us” (Matthew 1:23).

We need the presence of God with us. We need the presence of others in our lives. And we need to be present for and with others. They need us! The writer of Hebrews makes this clear – … let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near (Hebrews 10:24-25, ESV). There is great encouragement with “with,” and separation and discouragement without it.

This week, focus on the power and the blessing of WITH!

Living in Obscurity…

I’ve pastored four churches in my life. None of them have been megachurches. None of them have had a regular attendance of more than 250 in worship each week. I’ve mostly pastored in small towns. The exception to that was a church outside of Savannah, but it was in a smaller community. In other words, I’ve served the Lord in relative obscurity.

It’s true that I did write a book. I just checked. I’m ranked #528,851 on Amazon right now. Now, there are well over a million books in that ranking, so I’m probably in the top half, but my little book didn’t set the world on fire! By the way, it’s still available if you want to help push me up into the 400,000s!

Don’t get me wrong – I’m not sending out invitations to my pity party. I’ve learned from the examples of countless others that fame and fortune can come at a very high price. I’m good. I’m reasonably content. And I do believe that God has allowed me to make a difference in every place He has put me. Actually, as I consider it, I’m downright giddy at what He has put in my life… most of the time.

There are, of course, those times when I ask, “Why not me?” Spending a few minutes in the glow of the spotlight can sound appealing from time to time. Maybe I should refrain from such a revealing confession, but the reality is that I (like all of you) have an ego that sometimes jumps up and down and screams for attention. So, when I was reading this morning from Lance Witt’s book “Replenish,” I was comforted by these words. If you ever feel like you live in obscurity, maybe they will speak to you, as well.

Obscurity can be a bitter pill to swallow…

We love to talk about great people of faith who changed their world. Hebrews 11 talks about such people. These great men and women of faith conquered kingdoms, shut the mouths of lions, quenched the fury of the flames, became powerful in battle, routed foreign armies, and even raised the dead to life.

It would be great if the chapter ended there, leaving us inspired by the exponential potential of faith. But there’s a ninety-degree turn in the middle of verse 35, a subtle transition in the word “others.”

Their names are not listed. They will remain historically anonymous. These “others” were still great men and women of faith. In fact, “the world was not worthy of them.” But unlike those who experienced miracles and victory, these “others” were tortured, flogged, imprisoned, stoned, and put to death by the sword. They were destitute, often homeless, and they lived in obscurity.

Interestingly, “These were all commended for their faith, yet none of them received what had been promised.” None of them received what had been promised. Not yet. Not in this world. Not all of God’s promises had been fulfilled in this life.

But this life is not all there is. For them, their faith hadn’t delivered them from death; their faith caused their death. Their faith didn’t bring them fame; it brought danger. And following Jesus did not bring notoriety; it brought obscurity.

One of the spiritual health questions every ministry leader must answer is, “Am I willing to serve in obscurity?”

Lance Witt, Replenish: Leading from a Healthy Soul, pp. 87,88.

If you feel you’re living an obscure, unnoticed life? Then count yourself among the myriad of others both past and present whose devotion went unnoticed by all but God… But isn’t that what ultimately matters?

I Resolve…

Checking-boxes

There is no magic bullet to successfully accomplishing your New Year’s Resolutions, but here is a bit of the wisdom I have gleaned through the years on goal-achievement. One caveat – Knowing and doing are two different things!

Keys to Success in Accomplishing Your Goals:

  • Your goals must be aligned with your values.
  • Your goals can be motivated by fear (running away from) or by vision (running to), but there is greater joy in your journey if you’re running toward your vision.
  • You need accountability to stay on track.
  • You need a system to track progress BUT a good system doesn’t guarantee success.
  • Make sure what you’re investing in is worthy of your time, energy, resources, and heart.

Lessons in Living from a Dying Man…

The following is the text of my message on Sunday, December 29, 2019. This is not a transcript. The link to the audio message is below.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/426/2376959-lessons-in-living-from-a-dying-man

MESSAGE PREACHED AT GRACE FELLOWSHIP ON SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29

This afternoon, I have the honor of presiding over the memorial service for Harry Michael. Harry served in ministry for 45 of his 81 years. In that time, he made an impact on so many lives, but there were a few men into whom he poured his life and wisdom. As I consider Harry’s life, I thought about how Paul made a big impact on so many people but also spend time developing leaders who would step up to take his place.

Paul knew that his life had an expiration date. He had no delusion that he would somehow be spared the fate that comes to all of us. In fact, he knew that he was a marked man. His unyielding commitment to the gospel of Jesus had gotten him arrested and beaten time and again. He lived with an urgency…
– to share the gospel,
– to plant and grow churches, and
– to raise up a new generation who would carry on the task when he was gone.

For instance, let’s look together at a letter he wrote to Timothy – 

1 I charge you in the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who is to judge the living and the dead, and by his appearing and his kingdom:
2 preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching.
3 For the time is coming when people will not endure sound teaching, but having itching ears they will accumulate for themselves teachers to suit their own passions,
4 and will turn away from listening to the truth and wander off into myths.
5 As for you, always be sober-minded, endure suffering, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry.
6 For I am already being poured out as a drink offering, and the time of my departure has come.
7 I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith.
8 Henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that day, and not only to me but also to all who have loved his appearing.
(2 Timothy 4:1-8, ESV)

The charge that Paul gives Timothy is based on two things –
(1) The importance of the task
(2) The certainty of his departure

I want to spend most of my time focusing on Paul’s view of his departure, but let me take a minute or two to consider the importance of the charge Paul gives to Timothy:

– Paul charges Timothy with a charge to proclaim the word.
– The charge is carried out before the eyes of God. This isn’t a threat; it’s a promise.
– The charge is centered on God’s Word not human opinion.
– The charge is to be ready at all times to communicate God’s truth.
– The charge would require incredible patience. (example of William Carey who worked for 7 years in India before seeing his first convert to the Christian faith)
– The charge to preach God’s truth would not be accepted by everyone; in fact, it will be vehemently rejected.
– The charge would require perseverance in the face of incredible suffering.

Paul wrote these words to Timothy from prison in Rome. This was not Paul’s first arrest in Rome, but this time was different. During his first Roman imprisonment, Paul was under house arrest in a rented house, but when he wrote this second letter to Timothy he was chained up in a cold dungeon. His words reveal that he did not expect to be released. Paul’s life and ministry were coming to a close.

And he was right. Shortly after writing this letter, he was beheaded as a follower of Jesus. Let’s take a closer look at what he writes. Perhaps considering Paul’s approach to dying can help us learn better how to live.

6 For I am already being poured out as a drink offering, and the time of my departure has come. 

Paul understands that death is at hand.

Poured out as a drink offering – One of the offerings presented to the Lord by the Jewish people was to pour out a cup of wine at the altar. All the wine would be poured out. Paul said the pouring was already taking place. He knew the end was getting nearer.

Paul might also have a Roman custom in mind. At the end of a Roman dinner, a final cup of wine would be poured out as a sacrifice to the Roman gods. It signified the meal was done.

Either way, Paul is expressing his confidence that he didn’t have long left on this earth.

Time of departure is at hand – The Greek word for departure can mean to loose or unyoke an animal like an ox. The ox might plow all day, but at the end of the day the yoke would be taken from its neck, and it could rest. This may be the picture Paul had in mind as he considered the conclusion of his earthly life. His work was nearly done. It was time for rest.

7 I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. 

Paul expressed his confidence in a life well-lived for Christ.

Each of these expressions are tied to the Olympic style games that were played.

Fought the good fight – This has the meaning of competing or struggling with an adversary or compete for a prize. Paul says he gave it all he had.

Finished the race – Paul ran the course set out before him to completion. He didn’t quit along the way.

Kept the faith – Each athlete swore to compete by the rules, that they wouldn’t cheat or take short cuts. Paul had stayed true to his calling.

8 Henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that day, and not only to me but also to all who have loved his appearing.

Paul was certain of what awaited him at life’s end for himself and all believers.

Paul was confident that a reward was waiting for him upon his exit from this life. He calls it the crown of righteousness.

Based on his alusion of athletic contests, the crown Paul likely had in mind was the laurel wreath given to the winner of a race – similar to the gold medals given today. The crown will be given by the Lord who is the righteous Judge. And notice – Paul did not say he’s getting the victor’s crown because he has been a better Christian than everybody else. This award is not only for him but for everyone who is looking forward to seeing Jesus face-to-face.

Other than information, what do we find here that we can apply to our lives?
– We are to live knowing that life is short. (Carley McCord, 30)
– We are to give our best effort as we live for Christ each day.
– We can live with confidence that Jesus waits for us at the finish line.

IMPORTANT REMINDER – We don’t gain the crown by our own efforts. The crown is won for us by Jesus. Even so, we are called to run the race with faithfulness, giving our all, knowing that Jesus waits for us to fall into His arms at the finish line.

As we come to the end of 2019, let us evaluate our lives.

Do we truly realize that this day could be our last?

Are we giving God our best each day or just coasting?

Do we have absolute confidence that we will be among those welcomed by Jesus at life’s finish line?

Don’t Do Satan’s Work for Him…

I have been tempted so often to completely do away with Facebook. The good of Facebook is that it allows me to keep up with people I might otherwise lose track of. It allows me to reacquaint myself with friends all the way back from high school. It reminds me of birthdays and anniversaries and special events. It enables me to share positive and encouraging words with people on the other side of the world. It is also a platform for sharing prayer requests, audio and video messages, and reminders with my church family.

But there is a darker side to Facebook. It is littered with scams, frauds, and fake news. People use platforms like Facebook to post things they would never say to another person’s face. All decorum and decency gets striped away in a rush to share a video, comment, or “news” story. Fact-checking, even though it may only take a moment or two, is virtually nonexistent. I had an English teacher back at Roanoke High whose exclamation when she was appalled at something we said or wrote was – “Oh, vomit!” I regularly feel like saying that when perusing Facebook.

What makes it worse is the quick-to-judge attitude that believers have toward other believers. You’d think that if a Christian read an accusation against a brother or sister, that follower of Jesus would slow down, consider the accusation, consider the source, do everything within his or her power to determine what is true, what is false, and what is murky, and be hesitant to throw that believer (or Christian organization) under the bus.

My brothers and sisters, I am grieved daily at how quickly some believers are to throw other believers under the bus! And it seems hordes of other believers are willing to take the word of a Facebook post and climb on the bus demanding it be run back and forth over that accused brother or sister until he or she is thoroughly humiliated and their influence is no more.

We are told that Satan is “the accuser of the brethren.” Well, he can rest easy knowing that we, the body of Christ, will gladly take that mantel upon ourselves. The father of lies needs not lift a finger, since our fingers run frantically up and down our keyboards to do his nefarious work for him.

So I’m stuck with this Frankenstein’s monster of a social media platform. Its good aspects are very good. Its bad side is very bad. Perhaps it is more of a metaphor for life in the 21st century than I’d like to think.

For the two dozen or so people who will read this (I am under no illusion about my online impact in the world), let me offer some biblical advice as we close 2019 and enter into 2020. The words come from the Apostle Paul. They were written to a local church in the city of Ephesus. The world was not better then than it is now… and in many ways was much worse. He wrote —

“Get rid of all bitterness, rage, and anger, brawling and slander, along with every form of malice. Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ forgave you.” (Ephesians 4:31-32)

Instead of our ready response of outrage and our gnawing need to share accusations without taking even a minute to try to verify the truthfulness of said accusations, perhaps we might choose a different course. Perhaps we might be quick to listen, slow to speak, and slow to become angry. Perhaps our speech might be seasoned with grace. Perhaps our words might be marked by kindness and compassion rather than be dripping with snarkiness.

There are indeed times when we need to alert our brothers and sisters to wolves in sheep’s clothing, but there is no doubt that we are to speak the truth IN LOVE. Quite honestly, my Facebook feed is filled with far more unbridled outrage than Christlike love.

Bible Reading in 2020

Many Christians begin the new year with high hopes of reading God’s Word every day. Some go to great extremes to make sure that everything is in place – the right Bible, the right markers, the write note-taking journal, etc. Unfortunately, things begin to fall apart after week one. Life gets busy. We get lazy. Our once bright and shiny resolution finds itself shoved in a corner buried with the dust of our guilt.

Will 2020 be any different? Will you actually finish your Bible reading plan on December 31, 2020? Well… I have no clue. I do know this – if you don’t start, you won’t finish.

To help get you started, here are some helpful downloadable resources –
New Testament Reading Plan
One Year Chronological Bible
One Year Bible Plan
One Book at a Time Plan

In addition, there are a boatload of online reading plans and Bible reading apps, in fact, too many to mention. Here are a few options to search for –
The Bible App for Kids (FREE)
Bible by Life Church (FREE)
Daily Bible Verse (FREE)
Our Daily Bread (FREE)
Olive Tree Bible+ (FREE)

Another option is a podcast by Walk Thru the Bible. Each episode provides a short devotional thought and a guided journey through each day’s Scripture passage. This can be accessed through Apple Podcasts or Google Play. Follow THIS LINK.

Okay… that’s plenty to get your started. You can always ask friends what they use.

Here are a few tips –
Pick a plan. (Make it a reasonable one.)
If you miss a day, don’t quit – just pick up and keep going.
If you miss a few days, don’t quit – keep going.
If you end up missing half a year, don’t quit – keep going.
Read to know God more, not just to know more of God’s Word.

God’s Word is worthy of our time and effort. Let’s do this!

Living the Dream

This past Sunday, I shared Grace Fellowship’s Dream Statement. This is the dream that birthed Grace Fellowship in July of 2004, and it is the dream that continues to sustain us as we move forward in faith.

Grace Fellowship’s Dream Statement

It is a dream of hurting people encountering the grace of God through the life of His church.

It is a dream of God’s people gathering to experience genuine, life-changing worship.

It is a dream of creating an environment where the unchurched can discover what being a member of the body of Christ really means.

It is a dream of a church with a passion to see the unchurched enter into a life-changing relationship with Jesus Christ.

It is a dream of a church equipping its members to share the good news of Jesus with the aim of leading the unchurched into a personal relationship with Him.

It is a dream of a church committed to the Great Commission and expressing that commitment by giving generously to missions causes, by actively participating in local and international missions, and by helping to start new churches in areas needing a Christian witness.

It is a dream of a people who fully embrace others regardless of their race, age, or social standing.

It is a dream of the people of Greensboro, Greene County, and the Lake Oconee area being positively affected by the grace of God through the life, ministry, and worship of God’s people.

The best IS yet to come!

Review of KK Original Filled Doughnuts

Krispy Kreme Original Filled Doughnuts

I must admit that I did not make it to a Krispy Kreme location on Saturday to get my free Original Filled doughnut as part of KK’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, but my good friend Amy Ferman was sweet enough (no pun intended) to pick up one Chocolate Kreme filled and one Original Kreme filled for me (and the same order for my wife). In other words, I ate them a day after they were made — not the ideal taste test, but I’m not sure when I’ll get to either Athens or Milledgeville to get one fresh.

I came home having received the much-prized doughnuts at church. They remained undisturbed on my desk (except for a quick whiff) until I got home. I fixed a pot of coffee, settled into my recliner, and began the test. My verdict = YES! I’m not sure how the doughnut scientists pulled off this culinary masterpiece, but the doughnuts (even a day old) were superb – beyond what I had expected – and I had high expectations.

Admittedly, my doughnuts didn’t exactly match the picture above. I think the Chocolate Kreme filled was closer to the picture and had more filling than the Original Kreme filled, but neither had the perfect ring of filling inside the whole of the doughnut.

My wife asked me after I consumed them both (Original first followed by the Chocolate) which I thought was better. Although I thoroughly enjoyed them both, the Original Kreme was my favorite by far. I’d buy that doughnut every time I stopped in a KK… every – single – time.

If you didn’t try on Saturday, you missed your chance for a free one, but it is worth $1.09 plus tax, and you might was well get a cup coffee or a chocolate milk to make the most of your experience.

Disclaimer: I received no compensation from Krispy Kreme (monetary or otherwise) nor am I an official spokesperson for Krispy Kreme -- but I'm open to either. 🙂